5778 year of our world

wil

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BB, hopefully you can shed some light...

I heard where there is currently some Tanakh debate on the age of the books...

Some scholars saying 5-7th century bc....some rabbis arguing 8-11th century bc...

I think it is all relating on who's books are older, hindu, zoroastrians....but to me...the question is if the scholars are now going to say the books are older (I thought it was a consensus that the oral traditions lasted centuries if not millenia prior to writing down...

But anyway what significance will the calendar have?

What will year Zero signify if judaic theologians comverge on date older than the calendar?
 
Do conservative Jews dispute the idea that the earth is millions of years old, the way conservative Christians do?
 
It is an interesting question Nick, and while I think there maybe some orthodox that do, but not of any numbers like we have in the US...

But the question I have relates to biblical lineage and the development of the calendar itself and the now purported age of the stories and books which don't seem to jive.
 
What happened in the past is no more here.

Who said what first is a pointless debate.

Find out what is here, now.

Truth must always be present.
 
Thank you I think....for your contribution AdvaitaZen....

I am not debating but asking a question....

But thankfully your post is in the past...and is no more here...and we can get back to the topic at hand in the present.
 
Thank you I think....for your contribution AdvaitaZen....

I am not debating but asking a question....

But thankfully your post is in the past...and is no more here...and we can get back to the topic at hand in the present.

I simply find it strange how much time is wasted considering and debating things which cannot be solved without a time machine.

None were there, so we can only go on hearsay.

Truthfully, it is only another tangent the mind has taken you on so that you do not look closely into yourself. I have only tried to bring you back to the central inquiry, the only inquiry that genuinely matters: Who am I?

Without knowing yourself, what benefit can anything else in this world have? Dying without knowing even who lived is a great tragedy.

Cease the mental activity and see what is here.

Our time on this earth is limited enough without getting lost in every distraction.
 
Namaste Advaita Zen....

Please start a thread on "who am I" if this is your desire...but please quit wasting your precious time derailing this thread on a topic you don't wish to disucss and move it to thread you would like to.
 
BB, hopefully you can shed some light...

I heard where there is currently some Tanakh debate on the age of the books...

Some scholars saying 5-7th century bc....some rabbis arguing 8-11th century bc...

I think it is all relating on who's books are older, hindu, zoroastrians....but to me...the question is if the scholars are now going to say the books are older (I thought it was a consensus that the oral traditions lasted centuries if not millenia prior to writing down...

But anyway what significance will the calendar have?

What will year Zero signify if judaic theologians comverge on date older than the calendar?

i don't think it's that important, really. there are some people who really obsess about it, but really the calendar doesn't have much meaning for us before, say, noah or even abraham really, it's all tied up with the mystical significance of the ages of the patriarchs and the meaning of all the names of the people in the "begats" sections. there are many amongst the ultra-orthodox that maintain something very similar to the "young earth creationist" point of view, which most other people consider to be daft, but most people don't have a problem with either evolution or the universe being billions of years over. in fact there's an aryeh kaplan book where he makes the case for 14 billion based on the sources; there's plenty of room in there for whatever fits the facts. you won't get to "serious handbags" until we start arguing about when the exodus was, or when the Torah was Revealed etc, but you already know what i think about most of that. either way it don't much signifaaah, y'know?

b'shalom

bananabrain
 
i should say that the consensus is that the Oral Torah in many cases predated the giving of the Written Torah - otherwise, how did people get married? similarly, there are some customs, like halitzah, that are clearly older. equally clearly, the Written Torah also superseded some of the customs prior to it, like in regard to jacob marrying two sisters, which wouldn't be allowed, or the cousin-marriages earlier up the tree.

b'shalo

bananabrain
 
thx bb....now I am enthralled about the meanings of the names of the begats and the mystical significance of the ages of the partriarchs where do I start?
 
BB, hopefully you can shed some light...

I heard where there is currently some Tanakh debate on the age of the books...

Some scholars saying 5-7th century bc....some rabbis arguing 8-11th century bc...

I think it is all relating on who's books are older, hindu, zoroastrians....but to me...the question is if the scholars are now going to say the books are older (I thought it was a consensus that the oral traditions lasted centuries if not millenia prior to writing down...

But anyway what significance will the calendar have?

What will year Zero signify if judaic theologians comverge on date older than the calendar?

Being most old does not mean necessarily most truthful or having most reason part that the human could understand it with convenience.

Being old could be being in shabby condition requiring renovation and reformation.

Regards
 
Exactly, anything over a thousand years old should get extreme review and revisions for veracity before being considered for anything.
 
start with rashi - standard commentary on the chumash, available on the Judaism, Torah and Jewish Info - Chabad Lubavitch site (look up "parsha with rashi"). ramban (nahmanides) also very good on this.

remember, nothing in the Torah is there for no good reason.

b'shalom

bananabrain
the torah is a set of moral laws for all of us. there were also more than 300 laws given to moses and three conditions that must be met to violate a commandment. Most people don't know this. They just think there is ten commandments and it ends with that.
 
613 commandments for the Jews... and of them there are three unforgivable sins which have a death penalty, is that what you are referring?
 
613 commandments for the Jews... and of them there are three unforgivable sins which have a death penalty, is that what you are referring?

The laws of moses not only came with ten basic commandments but also three conditions that must be met in order to violate a commandment. One condition is that there cannot be any influence to commit a sin from any other source. And in holy terms a death doesn't mean to actually kill someone but rather to destroy the sin and save the sinner. Isnt that jesus whole message and isn't he the proof of that?
 
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