Something I read earlier today that I don't know where to put

Thomas

Administrator
Admin
Messages
12,590
Reaction score
2,752
Points
108
But I am conflicted ... I do respond to it all, tears looming at times over the weekend.

Sheesh, I choked up when I first heard the news ...
 
  • Like
Reactions: RJM

RJM

God Feeds the Ravens
Admin
Messages
9,283
Reaction score
2,194
Points
108
But I am conflicted ... I do respond to it all, tears looming at times over the weekend.

Sheesh, I choked up when I first heard the news ...
Nobody can replace her. She is an icon along with Nelson Mandela and Churchill -- a few others. The great people.* Harry and Meg don't cut it quite the same ...

* Great world figures ... there are many great people living ordinary lives, who are not public figures
 
Last edited:

RJM

God Feeds the Ravens
Admin
Messages
9,283
Reaction score
2,194
Points
108
But I like Wills and Kate for the new generation. They are sensible and dignified
 

RJM

God Feeds the Ravens
Admin
Messages
9,283
Reaction score
2,194
Points
108
think we'll all have to wait until we die for that ! ;)
Or I can choose to walk away from material attachments, never mind whatever others choose to do with their lives?
Bees have a queen. They feed her "Royal jelly". :D
She gives birth to them all. Her existence sustains the hive. Without her there wouldn't be any bees. And bees sustain nature ...
 

RJM

God Feeds the Ravens
Admin
Messages
9,283
Reaction score
2,194
Points
108
Do you know of any nation without leaders?
Tribes elect leaders for war, then the leaders get dug in and basically live off the proceeds, until they get chucked out or die. But the Queen is something else. The King is something else. The King is more than a leader. He is the heart of the people? He is annointed of God. By God. Arthurian legend: If the King prospers, the people and the land prosper?

Reverse too: when the King languishes, so do the people.
 
Last edited:

RJM

God Feeds the Ravens
Admin
Messages
9,283
Reaction score
2,194
Points
108
Kings aren't elected or chosen -- unless there's dispute -- kings are divinely ordained (by birth)?
 

RJM

God Feeds the Ravens
Admin
Messages
9,283
Reaction score
2,194
Points
108
Alexander the Great was a born King, as was Darius and the other kings he conquered. Xerxes and Leonidas were both born kings. Kings have held authority through history. The people held to their king. It was the heart of their national identity. With all the royal intrigues involved, of course. Democratic elections are quite new.
 

RJM

God Feeds the Ravens
Admin
Messages
9,283
Reaction score
2,194
Points
108
At least there isn't/wasn't Tangerine Palpatine to make it all about himself! (I apologize for inserting American politics here.)

Phyllis Sidhe_Uaine
I hope he fails. I hope if America decided to have a king, it wouldn't be him ...
 

Phyllis Sidhe_Uaine

Junior Moderator, Intro
Moderator
Messages
7,999
Reaction score
1,122
Points
108
Location
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
I hope he fails. I hope if America decided to have a king, it wouldn't be him ...
He is, so far. Hell, several of his "hand-picked" candidates have lost their elections (except for one or two) and the judge that he chose who is handling the case concerning the search warrant has pretty much bungled it in favour of the DoJ (she was chosen for her position in spite of having little-to-no qualifications!)

COVIDIUS XIX has been likened to the leader of the Moonies by an ex-Moonie, a manchild by his niece (who is a licensed psychiatrist) and the late "Reverend" Jim Jones (of Jonestown infamy,) but less charismatic!

Phyllis Sidhe_Uaine
 

Thomas

Administrator
Admin
Messages
12,590
Reaction score
2,752
Points
108
I'm not a Royalist.
..but I respect authority, unless it is clear that they oppose righteousness.
That's why I'm a republican ... or rather, the Royal Family has had its day.

Self-righteous, yes, but righteousness, defenders they were not.

+++

Here's a thing:
If you go to a popular exhibit at a gallery, a museum, whatever, you arrive, they issue you an armband and a time-slot, and you go away, and come back when it's your time.

This could have been done for the crowds coming to view the lying-in-state. But it wasn't. Why?

Because queuing, apart from one of those things we do really, really well, also bonds the people in the queue, and subtly reinforces the structures of authority. It's a message to those in the queue, and it's a message to us who followed it.

It wasn't about getting people into Westminster Hall. Had they done a modern queue system, a lot more people, the old and infirm, those with kids, dependents or jobs, or whatever, would have been able to go and visit, but it would have been less of a public spectacle.

+++

That the whole public thing 'is for the benefit of the public' is a nonsense. Nothing the RF does is public domain unless it serves an end. The RF is intensely private. The usage and subsequent management and mistreatment of a naive 16-year-old Diana is a matter of public record. She was the fairy-tale princess required for a public wedding. Camilla, the woman he actually loved, wouldn't fit the bill. The whole thing was a populist balloon-on-a-stick.

The covering of Andrew is an example of the misuse of authority.

Diana's death and funeral was never meant to be a public event, the Queen didn't want it, and tried to resist it.

+++

Royal births, weddings, funerals, etc., were never public spectacles until Queen Victoria's day.
 

Thomas

Administrator
Admin
Messages
12,590
Reaction score
2,752
Points
108
About HRH Queen Victoria –

Victoria was first past the post in a succession crisis when Princess Charlotte, the presumptive successor to King George, and her infant son died in childbirth.

Charlotte’s brothers – all of whom were single and busily shagging their way round Europe had earned the monarchy a bad name with their profligate spending and messy personal lives – raced to produce an heir. Edward married a widowed German princess and won the race. Born in 1819, Alexandrina Victoria was a direct successor to the crown.

Her father died when she was a child. Her ambitious mother allied herself with Sir John Conroy, who created the 'Kensington system' to isolate the young princess at Kensington Palace and put her under his control. When she ascended the throne at 18, she banned Conroy from her court and marginalised her mother. She married her cousin Albert, a German prince, which appears to have blossomed into a genuine love.

The monarchy’s reputation, because of her predecessors, was in the dirt, and the populace clamoured for a republic. A famine in Ireland, manipulated by English landowners, added to the ferment. Across Europe there was a growing public distaste at having to foot the bill for lavish Royal lifestyles.

Victoria started supporting charities, the arts, and civic reform to counter the view that British royalty wasn’t worth the expense. She and her family became celebrity influencers of popular culture, introducing such novelties as wedding dresses and Christmas trees.

Albert died, aged 42, in 1861. Victoria went into deep mourning and withdrew from the public eye. The republican movement grew during her isolation, and she was criticised for her absence from public life.

Victoria resumed her public duties by the late 1860s. Her later reign was consolidating her massive empire. She became Empress of India in 1877 and influenced foreign relations through her children and grandchildren marrying into European royalty.

England became the world’s most powerful nation, almost constantly at war, and the colonisation of the empire was achieved by the brutal subjugation of her subjects.
 

muhammad_isa

Save Our Souls
Messages
3,274
Reaction score
702
Points
108
Location
Worcester UK
England became the world’s most powerful nation, almost constantly at war, and the colonisation of the empire was achieved by the brutal subjugation of her subjects.
Yes, but too many people are racist these days, citing 'whites' as murderers etc.
That belongs in the past.

"...
and forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
...
"

Our modern society is very different.
The late Chancellor, Rishi Sunak is of Asian descent..

"Born in Southampton to parents of Indian descent who migrated to Britain from East Africa in the 1960s"
-wiki-
 

Thomas

Administrator
Admin
Messages
12,590
Reaction score
2,752
Points
108
Yes, but too many people are racist these days, citing 'whites' as murderers etc.
That belongs in the past.
But people live in the past – that's why all this stuff works – and civilisation is a sheen on the surface, we've all seen evidence of that.

Brexit was based on, and won on, racism.

Look at Hindus and Muslims in Leicester. They lived quite happily side-by-side ...

And I'm not saying I don't forgive ... don't know why you bring that up.

Our modern society is very different.
But the membership of the conservative party weren't going to elect Rishi Sunak. Rather they went for a career opportunist repurposing herself as a Thatcher lookalike with hardly any support among parliamentary MPs.

So while the holders of high office are more ethnically diverse, they are all privately-educated. Kwarteng went to Eton, the others to schools with annual fees costing thousands. As did Health Minister and Deputy PM Therese Coffey. These schools imbue entitlement and privilege.

68% of Truss’ cabinet are privately educated (less than 10% of the population is), and of the 22-strong cabinet, 17 hold seats in South of England.
 
Top